About PetersPioneersCensus for Charles and Mary Gow Byrne Household

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 192019301940
Source Image Image Image
Index Name Byrne Byrne Byrne
Address 101 50th Street, Corona, Queens, New York 61-37 162nd Street, Flushing, Queens, New York 156-14 59th Avenue, Flushing, Queens, New York
Head of Household Charles, 25, clerk-butter & egg, renter, born in New York, parents born in New York Charles, 35, real estate, born in New York, parents born in New York Charles, 45, renter, born in New York
Wife Mary, 24, housewife, born in England, naturalized in 1917, father born in Scotland, mother born in England Mary, 34, housewife, married 13 years, born in England, immigrated in 1895, father born in Scotland, mother born in England Mary, 39, housewife, born in England
Daughter Rosemary, 9 Rosemary, 19, clerk-public library
Son Donald, 6 Donald, 16
Son Jay, 4 Charles, 13
Son William, 9/12 William, 10
Daughter Helen, 8

New York Division
27th Infantry Division shoulder sleeve insignia. Source: John F. O'Ryan.
Charles Joseph Byrne's death certificate says he was born on August 30, 1894, in Staten Island, New York, and died March 27, 1948, at work at 2 am of arterio sclerotic heart disease. He died at age 53. He was a foreman at the Lily Tulip Co. when he died. He and his wife Mary lived at 156 14 59th Avenue in Flushing, Queens. His parents were William and Mary Cassidy Byrne, both born in Albany, New York.

Charles Joseph Byrne's enlistment form for the New York Naval Militia says he enlisted on August 31, 1912, was age 19, and lived at 509 Pelham Street, Pelham Manor, New York.

Charles Joseph Byrne's WWII draft registration card says he was age 47 and born on August 30, 1894, in Staten Island, New York. It says he worked for the Hunter Sign Co. in Flushing. He and his wife Mary lived at 156 14 59th Avenue in Flushing. This was the fourth WWII draft, conducted on April 27, 1942, for men age 45-64 (born 1877-1897).

His burial record at Long Island National Cemetery says he died March 27, 1948. He served as a bugler in the 102 Engineers, 27th Division, New York National Guard, from 1916 to 1919. His wife Mary was buried in the same plot in 1977 (Find A Grave).

The 27th Division of the U.S. Army consisted of the New York National Guard. It trained at Camp Wadsworth in Spartanburg, South Carolina. It was known as the New York Division. Units included:

The Commanding Officer of the 27th Division was Major General John F. O'Ryan. The 27th Division shoulder sleeve insignia includes stars and initials. The stars depict the Orion constellation, a pun on O'Ryan's surname. The "O" on the outside edge stands for "O'Ryan," and the letters inside form the abbreviation "NYD" for "New York Division."

The Commanding Officer of the 102nd Engineers was Cornelius Vanderbilt III, a great grandson of the Commodore.

In March 1916, the 102nd Engineers joined the Pancho Villa Expedition. Revolutionary Pancho Villa had led a hit and run raid against the small border town of Columbus, New Mexico, and then fled in fear of U.S. retaliation. Woodrow Wilson sent U.S. Army General John J. Pershing to capture Villa. The 27th Division was sent to Texas as a back-up in July, but did not see action. The 102nd Engineers returned in October and December. Pancho Villa was never captured.

On April 6, 1917, two days Congress voted to declare war, the United States formally entered the First World War. The 27th Division trained at Camp Wadsworth until departing for France in May 1918. On May 17, the 102nd Engineers sailed on the USS Pocahontas from Newport News. They arrived at St. Nazaire on May 30. The 27th Division was engaged with the British in the Hindenburg line smash during World War I. See: The Story of the 27th Division.

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